Page & Palette

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Robert Olen Butler

Public Relations
Robert Olen Butler, Author

Robert Olen Butler, Author

1. If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

Going to the theater in London night after night.

2. What book impacted your life the most and how?

The collected dramatic works of William Shakespeare. I was, as the son of the chairman of the theater department at St. Louis University, fully aware of and often exposed to Shakespeare from childhood. But I read him in full in an intensively short few months when I was an undergraduate at Northwestern University. What I’d already begun to absorb through my early years, in the way a child can readily learn a second language, finally, fully impacted me as a twenty year-old: the lush rhythms of his language, the dynamic energy of his stories, his deep insight into a remarkable range of characters. 


3. Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.

Though I’ve published eleven books in the past sixteen years, twenty-three books in the past thirty-five, I constantly struggle against the lazy bum of a couch-dweller in me.

Amelia Martens

Public Relations
Amelia Martens, Author

Amelia Martens, Author

1. If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

I would read! I also love cooking, traveling, gardening, and learning. I love teaching and helping people access the power of language. I'd want to spend time learning more about art and music. For an example day, I'd do yoga near the ocean, go to a local bookstore, play with my daughters in the garden, cook dinner mostly from ingredients in our yard, read and write a bit with a smooth, old bourbon on the porch and watch the sun go down. Probably I'd spend other days working on problems related to literacy education and social justice. 

2. What book impacted your life the most and how?

The summer before ninth grade, for Honors English, we were assigned to read several books, including Sula by Toni Morrison. The way Morrison uses language in this book (and in all her works) connects to something deep in my experience of being human. Before reading Morrison, I didn't know words could be like paint or music notes. I didn't know a writer could have a voice or make a world that would become part of the reader forever. 


3. Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.

I used to work on movie sets as a greensman and set dresser, and have awesome truck loading skills, in addition to being able to drive a scissor lift and a condor. 

Stephanie Crowe

Public Relations
Stephanie Crowe, Page & Palette Book Dept. 

Stephanie Crowe, Page & Palette Book Dept. 

1. If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

If money no object I would travel, might buy a bookstore and try to help others.

2. What book impacted your life the most and how?

If I were looking at my whole life from earliest to now, perhaps the Bible was my earliest influence. Another book that I found powerful was "The Power of One" by Bryce Courtenay. It offered me understanding although I don’t think I made any major changes in my life.

3. Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.

I have been an Easter Bunny for many years, made my mama’s recipe for confectioner’s eggs dipped in chocolate. I sent them all over the world and wore a bunny costume when making deliveries. Have recently retired but occasionally come out of retirement to make for family.

Nathan Weathington

Public Relations
Nathan Weathington, Author

Nathan Weathington, Author


1. If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

When the weather is nice and the sun is up, I’d fly fish until my arm fell off. But in the winter, bad weather days, and after the sun goes down, I’d try to make people laugh. I would continue to write comic memoirs, but I’d also like to try fiction, screenplays, and doing a little more standup and acting.

2. What book impacted your life the most and how?

Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea. When I first read this book, I knew I was reading perfection. Like a lot of us, I fantasized about being an expat in a cafe in Paris writing prose that would inspire millions. But I knew I would never write at this level, so I never even attempted to write anything until I was 34. When I finally started writing, it was the complete opposite of the fantasy — I was writing smart-ass horoscopes for a local paper (and loving it even more).  

3. Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.

As part of my MBA, our class did a consulting project in Seoul, South Korea. At 2:00 a.m., and after a few too many bottles of rice wine, I was shoved on the karaoke stage and told to sing. I refused, the DJ silenced the music, and I was told to do something funny. I did my first standup bit, and closed with a horribly inappropriate joke about the most moral girl in our class who happened to be sitting in the front row. This left the crowd slack jawed and laughing hysterically, and I was I hooked on comedy. My future publisher was also in the audience, and several years later I landed a book deal based on my grandpa’s old ‘Chestnut’ joke. 

Kate DiCamillo

Public Relations
Kate DiCamillo, Author

Kate DiCamillo, Author

1. If money were no object, how would you spend your time?
Reading!  (And writing.  And playing Scrabble.  And walking a dog.  And being with friends).  

  
2. What book impacted your life the most and how?
How about two books?
The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler--because it made me want to write.
The Watsons Go to Birmingham, 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis--because it made me want to write books for kids.


3. Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.
I had to think about this one for a long time.  And here's the truth of the matter--those people who know me well really *know* me.  They know all of my good qualities and all of my bad qualities and nothing about me would surprise them and that is why they are my friends.
 

Karen Spears Zacharias

Public Relations
Karen Spears Zacharias, Author

Karen Spears Zacharias, Author

1. If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

According to my husband, I already live as if money is no object. In truth, I try to live a good story while in search of good stories: traveling, listening, laughing, and engaging with the local community. The thing I love most about Fairhope is its dedication to honoring creators and creativity. If Fairhope were a beauty pageant contestant, she'd win Miss Congeniality because she's so beloved by all who meet her.   

2. What book impacted your life the most and how?

Oh, snap, that's like asking me which of my four kids I would keep if I could only have one. But if I have to choose ONLY one book, I'm going to say the Epistle of James. The influential women in my life - my grandmother and my great-aunt  - made reading the Bible (a compilation of many books) a daily morning ritual. As a child I witnessed this practice, as an adult I try to model it. I love the poetry and the cadence of the old King James version and the storytelling in The Message, Eugene Peterson's translation. James, in particular, has shaped my theology and daily approach to living out my faith. 

3. Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.

I've been kissed by Sam Elliott. (Who say's there isn't such a thing as heaven on earth?) 

 

Robert Bailey

Public Relations

If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

Well, this is going to sound boring, but I’d probably do many of the same things I do now except more of them.  Write a lot, read a lot and spend as much time as possible with my family.  However, I have to admit that I might do more of those things at the beach!  Ha!

Katarina Bivald

Public Relations

Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.
Success is not all that it’s cracked up to be. Failure is very boring, of course, but there is some sort of inherent contradiction in living the dream. Choosing to follow a dream, yes; working towards it, definitely, even that sweet moment when you’ve fulfilled it – but living it? I have no idea how you do that. And yet most people I know would look at me and think: “Katarina, now there’s someone who’s living her dream”. 

Charles Shields

Public Relations

1. If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

Money is no object. I live better than most of the people in the world, in a free country, in a loving relationship, and doing the work I’ve always wanted to do. Lots of money would be a nuisance, so I would give it away.

Erik Larson

Douglas Anderson

Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.

When I was in high school and in the first two years of college I had bad acne and wore underwear on my head to keep my hair off my forehead. Fruit of the Loom briefs, to be exact. There you have it. 

Kathleen Grisson

Douglas Anderson

What book impacted your life the most and how?

Five Little Peppers and How They Grew by Margaret Sidney was one of the first books I read as a child. I was very lucky to be raised in a home where everything was stable. The children in this story knew hardship and because of them I began to realize that not everyone lived as I did. Then I wanted to know more.

Stacy Sheehan-Wilson

Douglas Anderson

If money were no object, how would you spend your time?

"I’d spend time just as I am.  As a family, we’ve made choices to be brave.  We moved from Colorado, having always loved water, I left corporate to be an artist, and our boys are young enough to like having me around."

Amy Hollimon

Douglas Anderson

What book impacted your life the most and how?

"Nancy Drew books. First ones that got me interested in reading as a kid. And my mom took me to our local kids’ gift store explicitly to buy them."

Ashley Gordon

Douglas Anderson

What book impacted your life the most and how?

"Orlando by Virginia Wolf for its depiction of strong, constantly evolving female characters in a male-dominated societal structure, written by a woman who helped to redefine modern English literature."

Heather Hickox

Douglas Anderson

Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you.

"Something that many people may not know about me is that I worked as an extra in Hollywood a few years ago when we were in California for 6 months, and got to be Vanna White’s photo double in a Wheel of Fortune/Jeopardy commercial."

Sonya Bennett

Douglas Anderson

Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you?

"Most people know me well but many do not know that I am very introspective and sometimes mischievous."

Ron Meszaros

Douglas Anderson

Tell us something about you that would surprise most of the people who think they know you?

"I kissed Robert Wagner smack on the lips in the middle of Musso Frank's Restaurant in Hollywood in 1983."